The Flame Bearer – Bernard Cornwell

The Flame Bearer - Bernard Cornwell
The Flame Bearer – Bernard Cornwell

Uthred returns to the North, and Bebbanberg.

A warrior’s lifetime of experience of fighting, working out the politics and strategies of his friends, enemies and those who flex between, and the advantages of confident bluff and subterfuge all combine to get Uthred and his men inside the walls of the ancestral home he had been forced to leave as a child.

Inside, but not in control of.

Author’s webpage: The Flame Bearer – Bernard Cornwell

Warriors of the Storm – Bernard Cornwell

More battles with Saxon/Danish warlord, Uhtred, this time against Irish Viking, Ragnall whose brother Sigtryggr he (and we) met in Chester in The Empty Throne, and who eloped with Uhtred’s daughter Stiorra.

Stiorra is one of three strong women in the tale, alongside Queen Æthelflaed of Mercia and Uhtred’s former lover Brida.

And finally – FINALLY- it looks like Uhtred is in a position to return to reclaim Bebbanburg.

Author’s webpage: Warriors of the Storm – Bernard Cornwell, The Last Kingdom Series/Warrior Chronicles/Saxon Stories – Book 9

The Pagan Lord – Bernard Cornwell

Read mostly on the train travelling up to Edinburgh – passing close to Bebbanburg (Bamburgh Castle) en route – and finished off by the light of our Premier Inn room…

In a daring seaborne raid, Uhtred tries to regain Bebbanburg – his home and birthright – but finds the Fates against him. Fleeing south he finds himself embroiled (willingly, of course) in the resumption of the war between the Saxons and Danes, with Æthelred of Mercia tempted to extend his power into East Anglia, only to find that it’s all a cunning plan by Cnut Longsword and Haesten of Chester. Lots of fighting, lots of familiar figures from Uhtred’s long life – 50 years is an old age for a pagan warrior – but most of all, The Pagan Lord is a book about family.

Author’s webpage: The Pagan Lord – Bernard Cornwell

Sharpe’s Fury – Bernard Cornwell

“… in which Captain Sharpe has to protect a philandering diplomat and, deserted by his ally, faces the enemy” (as the blurb says), with the part of the philandering diplomat going to Ambassador Henry Wellesley, the Duke of Wellington’s younger brother, and Colonel Henri Vandal being the enemy sought by Sharpe and his men during the surprise British victory over the French at the Battle of Barrosa.

Author’s page: Sharpe’s Fury – Bernard Cornwell